FAQ ┬╗ Cocaine

Cocaine Addiction Treatment

Cocaine, also known as coke, blow, powder, or nose candy, is a stimulant drug. It is typically produced into a powder and can be snorted, smoked, or intravenously injected as a solution. Cocaine is typically created by synthesizing coca leaves, a natural plant from South America. In the early 1900s, the purified chemical, cocaine hydrochloride, was isolated from the plant for the first time. Cocaine is now sold as cocaine hydrochloride or it is diluted with other substances, such as cornstarch or talcum powder, or other drugs like amphetamines or caffeine.

In the U.S., cocaine is classified as a Schedule II drug, which means it has a high potential for misuse.

Cocaine is one of the most powerfully addictive drugs. It has a stimulant effect on the brain that is immediate: a sense of euphoria, a numbing of the senses, and drastic changes to the central nervous system. This causes a variety of behavioral changes and mental delusions. Cocaine can cause heart attacks, strokes, and seizures, and in some rare cases, sudden death on the first use. It is a Schedule II drug, which means it has a high potential for abuse but can be administered by a doctor in certain medical instances┬╣. Crack is a very dangerous type of cocaine that is smoked. Crack is extremely addictive and can cause major organs to stop performing their normal functions.

Immediately affecting the brain, cocaine creates a sense of euphoria, numbs the senses, and causes drastic changes to the central nervous system. This causes a variety of behavioral changes and mental delusions. Crack is a very dangerous type of cocaine, which is smoked. It can cause permanent alterations to brain cell activity and further shrink blood vessels. Crack is extremely addictive and can cause major organs to stop performing their normal functions in the body. This is as a result of affected vessels ceasing to transmit normal bodily signals, which can kill users immediately after consumption.


References:

  1. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/cocaine/what-cocaine
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Cocaine